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Impressionism
The Hasso Plattner Collection

The Museum Barberini in Potsdam shows impressionist paintings from the extensive collection of Hasso Plattner, the museum’s founder. More than 100 masterpieces by Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir, Berthe Morisot, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, Henri-Edmond Cross, Paul Signac, and other impressionist and postimpressionist artists are on permanent display. With 34 paintings by Claude Monet, there is no venue in Europe outside of Paris where visitors can see more works by this painter. Potsdam is thus one of the most important centers of impressionist land- scape painting in the world.

Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Alfred Sisley formed a group in the 1860s and revolutionized art with light-infused landscapes that were liberated from the traditional subject matter of the era. In 1874 they became known as the “Impressionists”: artists who preferred to work outdoors, capturing fleeting impressions directly on the canvas. Painters such as Berthe Morisot, Paul Cézanne, and Gustave Caillebotte joined this new movement. More than a decade later, artists such as Paul Signac and Henri-Edmond Cross further developed the painting style of these pioneers. Even in their Neo-Impressionist compositions, focus on the landscape remained linked to the liberation of color—an aspect that was reinforced by the high-key compositions of the Fauves such as Maurice de Vlaminck and André Derain. Impressionists, Neo-Impressionists, and Fauves followed the ideal of making nature tangible through color and light.

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“The paintings involve us as viewers in a very direct way. We can practically feel the wind on our skin and the temperature of the water when we look at Monet’s sailboats on the Seine. No other art can do that. The Impressionists are geniuses of communication.”

Hasso Plattner, Museum’s founder and patron
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“No other collection can present Impressionist landscape painting as comprehensively and coherently in terms of its development and iconography. Through our works, visitors can learn about the fascinating history of the Impressionist movement as well as the further development of landscape through the Neo-Impressionists and Fauves.”

Ortrud Westheider, Director, Museum Barberini